By the end of this decade, seven out of every ten of the world’s mammals, amphibians, fishes, reptiles and birds will have been wiped out, according to the reports from the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). Some of the most threatened species include African elephants, tigers, mountain gorillas and giant pandas.

Giant Pandas
Caption: CNN

World Wide Fund for Nature

The World Wide Fund for Nature is an international non-governmental organization founded in 1971, working in the field of the wilderness preservation. It is the world’s largest conservation organization with over five million supporters worldwide, working in more than 100 countries, supporting around 1,300 conservation and environmental projects. The group’s mission is to “to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature.”

According to the Daily Mail, Director of science and policy at WWF-UK, Mike Barrett said: “For the first time since the demise of the dinosaurs, we face a global mass extinction of wildlife. Humanity’s misuse of natural resources is threatening habitats, pushing irreplaceable species to the brink and threatening the stability of our climate.”Global populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles are projected to decline by 67 percent from 1970 levels by the end of this decade.

GLOBAL MASS EXTINCTIONS
Caption: New York Daily News

Global populations of fishes, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles are projected to decline by 67 percent from 1970 levels by the end of 2020. He further added: “We know how to stop this. It requires governments, businesses and citizens to rethink how we produce, consume, measures success and value the natural environment.”

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