Mysterious Sculptures Question Boundaries Of Human Form

South Korean artist Choi Xooang creates hyperrealistic sculptures that depict the human form in its whole and its parts. It’s little surprise then that the Seoul-born South Korean declares: “If one feels uncomfortable physically or mentally when viewing my work, I would say it worked.”

Sculpture

The author of the 2012 book “Korean Contemporary Art” Miki Wick Kim says: “There is a thread of fine craftsmanship that runs through his work, exquisite rendering. And of course, good artwork embodies so many different things coming together — it can’t just be a tangible gorgeous surface, it needs to have context and relevance.”

Mysterious Sculpture

Political Roots

South Korea has changed dramatically since becoming a democracy in 1987. Choi has studied sculpture at Seoul National University and held his first exhibition in 2002.

“I don’t try and say something directly [with my art] as if I were a flag bearer of the general public,” Choi says. “It’s more like I’m working to portray questions to society and the public living in this obscure situation.”

xooang choi

“People tend to think positively of couples, it was said that society needs to be ‘one,’ almost like propaganda. If that’s set forcefully, saying we need to become one, wouldn’t it be unfortunate? I showed that being stitched together hurts,” says Choi.

xooang choi 2

Misinterpretation

His Sculptures which normally, take between two and five months to complete, have frequently drawn comparisons to horror films. But Choi insists he isn’t influenced by such films.

Sculpture by south-korean artist

“I worked to convey the expressions of the hands: Giving power, supporting each other, rather than [trying to] make it look like cut-off corpse hands,” he says.

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